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Types of Markets

by Shannon Treece

It’s a buyer’s market. It’s a seller’s market. You’ve probably heard these terms before. But what do they really mean when you’re considering buying or selling a home?

A buyer’s market exists when the supply of homes in a particular market exceeds the demand. Since there are more homes for sale, and fewer buyers, homes tend to stay on the market longer and prices may drop.

As a home shopper, you would have more time to look for a home, and more negotiating leverage.

In a seller’s market, by contrast, there are more buyers looking around than there are homes for sale. This would be an advantage when selling a home because the demand would likely cause the home to sell more quickly and for a better price.

As a home shopper, however, you would have to make decisions more quickly, since others may be interested in the same properties.

As you can see, each market has its pros and cons – for both buyers and sellers.

Luckily, a Realtor® who understands your local market can help you navigate through either market condition and help get you into your next dream home.

Bedrooms - Help your home sell faster with these tips!

by Shannon Treece

Here’s a surprising statistic. In several surveys, upwards of 60% of people surveyed listed “bedrooms” as one of the reasons they decided to purchase a particular property. So don’t overlook these rooms when preparing your house for sale. You need to make sure they appear roomy and attractive to potential buyers.

The first step is to make sure every bedroom actually has a bed. Otherwise, you might inadvertently give the impression that your home has fewer bedrooms than it really does. To a potential buyer, a bedroom is often more valuable than the home office or storage room you may have converted it into.

You can’t change the number of bedrooms your home actually has, but you can make sure that each one shows well. Consider the layout of each room carefully. Is the bed and other furniture placed in a way that makes the room appear as spacious as possible? Can buyers easily walk around the bed? Are the curtains, bedding and other décor items clean and attractive?

Finally, buyers will understand that a kid’s room may be somewhat cluttered and may even have an eclectic style, but you need to make sure it’s as clean and tidy as possible.

Have questions about how to prepare your house for sale? Call today.

How Much Is Experience Worth? According To This Study - $25,000

by Sanette Tanaka - Wall Street Journal - 9/12/2013

 

Can you put a price on experience? In real estate, you can. It is about $25,000 for the average house.

Veteran agents sell homes for an average of 12% more than their less experienced counterparts, says Bennie Waller, professor of finance and real estate at Longwood University in Farmville, Va. Veteran agents also tend to list more new properties, more townhouses and condominiums and larger properties.

Two-thirds of properties listed by veteran agents sold, while only half of properties listed by rookies did.

"The more experience you have, the more likely you are to sell the properties that you list, the more likely you are to sell it at a higher price and the less time it stays on the market," Prof. Waller says.

Prof. Waller, along with Ali Jubran, a student at Longwood University at the time, examined 10,065 real-estate listings in a mid-Atlantic multiple-listing service from March 1999 to July 2009. They divided the listings into three groups—ones listed by agents who have been licensed for two years or less (called rookies), agents who have been licensed for two to 10 years and agents who have been licensed for 10 years or more (called veterans). They controlled for property characteristics such as size and location to isolate the "experience variable," and then compared the results for rookies and veterans. The study was published in the Journal of Housing Research in May 2012.

Prof. Waller became interested in quantifying experience when he noticed an increasing number of agents who chose not to renew their licenses after two years. Real estate has "very, very, very low barriers to entry," he says. But brokers then face a steep learning curve and many struggle to reach a level of expertise that is profitable, he adds.

Two-thirds of properties listed by veteran agents sold, while only half of properties listed by rookies did. That may be because rookie agents have to be more flexible in picking up listings, even if the chances of selling are low.

"If a house is priced ridiculously, they might say, 'Fine, I'll take the listing,' " Prof. Waller says.

Generally, experienced agents have greater knowledge of the neighborhoods and a larger network of buyers and sellers, as well as relationships with home inspectors, appraisers and mortgage brokers.

For some, confidence comes with time. James Stroupe, a real-estate agent at Realogics Sotheby's International Realty in Seattle, says he used to take listings priced above-market, but now, with nearly 20 years of experience under his belt, he isn't afraid to suggest an alternative price.

And then there are the lessons learned. Michael Rankin, principal and managing partner of TTR Sotheby's International Realty in Washington, D.C., began selling real estate right out of college, so he faced the twin pitfalls of inexperience and youth.

"I would meet people and say I'm a real-estate agent. They would joke and say, 'I've got children older than you. Are you sure you're a real-estate agent?' " he says.

Mr. Rankin says he didn't get referrals until his third year in the business. Referrals now make up about 70% of his sales. His listings stock also has changed dramatically. In his 20s, his average sale price was about $300,000 to $400,000. Now, it is more than $2 million.

Experience taught him how to deal with consumer behavior. "Residential real estate is really an emotional transaction. I don't think I was prepared for any of it. It's about understanding and knowing people. That, to me, is what an experienced broker brings to the table," he says.

When Pamela J. Hagan first began practicing real estate about 30 years ago, she had a listing that just wouldn't sell. After zero offers in eight months, she asked a more experienced agent to help. "We tweaked the price and staged it properly, removed clutter and everything. I just didn't think of that when I was new," says Ms. Hagan, of Century 21 Beggins Enterprises in Longboat Key, Fla. "After we got it all set up and dropped the price, we sold it within 30 days."

Pricing and Market Value

by Shannon Treece
If you’re selling your home, you’ll have a very personal perspective on what it‘s worth. You’ll remember all the hours you put into making the backyard flower garden beautiful, or the work you put into renovating the basement, or the money you spent on installing new hardwood floors in the living room and hallways.

It’s natural to want these improvements factored into the asking price.

However, potential buyers don’t have that same perspective.

Although they may appreciate the improvements made to the home, buyers will only be interested in paying current market value for your property. That’s the price for which comparable homes with comparable features are currently selling in your area.

Buyers don’t see all the hours you spent on improvements and renovations.

What they see, instead, are the final features: the hardwood floors, the freshly painted bedrooms, the sparkling new master ensuite. Features like these will certainly help sell your home faster and for the best price — but that price will likely be close to the current market value.

Now, it’s tempting to try to set a list price high above the current market value in the hopes that some buyer will appreciate all the time and money put into the property. But that strategy rarely, if ever, works. In most cases, pricing your home higher than comparable properties on the market only discourages potential buyers from viewing it.

Buyers expect to pay market price.

The good news is that the current market value of your home may be a lot higher than you think.

The only way to know for sure is to have an experienced REALTOR® look at it and provide you with an estimate.

Want to find out the current market value of your home? Call today.

Displaying blog entries 1-4 of 4

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Shannon Treece
The Janet Jones Company/REALTORS
7915 Cantrell
Little Rock AR 72227
Mobile: (501) 960-8743
Office: (501) 224-3201